The SHA-1 End Times Have Arrived

“Deadlines imposed by browser makers deprecating support for the weakened SHA-1 hashing algorithm have arrived,” writes Slashdot reader msm1267. “And while many websites and organizations have progressed in their migrations toward SHA-2 and other safer hashing algorithms, pain points and potential headaches still remain.”
Threatpost reports:

Starting on Jan. 24, Mozilla’s Firefox browser will be the first major browser to display a warning to its users who run into a site that doesn’t support TLS certificates signed by the SHA-2 hashing algorithm… “SHA-1 deprecation in the context of the browser has been an unmitigated success. But it’s just the tip of the SHA-2 migration iceberg. Most people are not seeing the whole problem,” said Kevin Bocek, VP of security strategy and threat intelligence for Venafi. “SHA-1 isn’t just a problem to solve by February, there are thousands more private certificates that will also need migrating”…
Experts warn the move to SHA-2 comes with a wide range of side effects; from unsupported applications, new hardware headaches tied to misconfigured equipment and cases of crippled credit card processing gear unable to communicate with backend servers. They say the entire process has been confusing and unwieldy to businesses dependent on a growing number of digital certificates used for not only their websites, but data centers, cloud services, and mobile apps… According to Venafi’s research team, 35 percent of the IPv4 websites it analyzed in November are still using insecure SHA-1 certificates. However, when researchers scanned Alexa’s top 1 million most popular websites for SHA-2 compliance it found only 536 sites were not compliant.

The article describes how major tech companies are handling the move to SHA-2 compliance — including Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Salesforce and Cloudflare

Read more of this story at Slashdot.