Ask Slashdot: Should Web Browsers Have 'Fact Checking' Capability Built-In?

Reader dryriver writes: There is no shortage of internet websites these days that peddle “information”, “knowledge”, “analysis”, “explanations” or even supposed “facts” that don’t hold up to even the most basic scrutiny — one quick trip over to Wikipedia, Snopes, an academic journal or another reasonably factual/unbiased source, and you realize that you’ve just been fed a triple dose of factually inaccurate horsecrap masquerading as “fact”. Unfortunately, many millions of more naive internet users appear to frequent sites daily that very blatantly peddle “untruths”, “pseudo-facts” or even “agitprop-like disinformation”, the latter sometimes paid for by someone somewhere. No small number of these more gullible internet users then wind up believing just about everything they read or watch on these sites, and in some cases cause other gullible people in the offline world to believe in them too. Now here is an interesting idea: What if your internet browser — whether Edge, Firefox, Chrome, Opera or other — was able provide an “information accuracy rating” of some sort when you visit a certain URL. Perhaps something like “11,992 internet users give this website a factual accuracy rating of 3.7/10. This may mean that the website you are visiting is prone to presenting information that may not be factually accurate.” You could also take this 2 steps further. You could have a small army of “certified fact checkers” — people with scientific credentials, positions in academia or similar — provide a rolling “expert rating” on the very worst of these websites, displayed as “warning scores” by the web browser. Or you could have a keyword analysis algorithm/AI/web crawler go through the webpage you are looking at, try to cross-reference the information presented to you against a selection of “more trusted sources” in the background, and warn you if information presented on a webpage as “fact” simply does not check out. Is this a good idea? Could it be made to work technically? Might a browser feature like this make the internet as a whole a “more factually accurate place” to get information from?That’s a remarkable idea. It appears to me that many companies are working on it — albeit not fast enough, many can say. Google, for instance, recently began adding “Fact check” to some stories in search results. I am not sure how every participating player in this game could implement this in their respective web browsers though. Then there is this fundamental issue: the ability to quickly check whether or not something is indeed accurate. There’s too much noise out there, and many publications and blogs report on things (upcoming products, for instance) before things are official. How do you verify such stories? If the NYTimes says, for instance, Apple is not going to launch any iPhone next year, and every website cites NYTimes and republishes it, how do you fact check that? And at last, a lot of fake stories circulate on Facebook. You may think it’s a problem. Obama may think it’s a problem, but does Facebook see it as a problem? For all it care, those stories are still generating engagement on its site.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.