Never Give Your Password Over the Phone

Never give your password to someone over the phone. If someone calls you and asks for your password while saying they are from the Help Desk or Tech Support team, it is an attacker attempting to gain access to your account.

More Than Ever, Employees Want a Say in How Their Companies Are Run

Two readers share a report: While workers have traditionally looked to unions to address their grievances, a new generation is trusting in the power of petitions to force changes. At the Wall Street Journal, 160 reporters and editors, delivered a letter to their managers protesting the lack of women and minorities running the organization, Business Insider reported yesterday. “Nearly all the people at high levels at the paper deciding what we cover and how are white men,” the letter read. IBM employees are circulating an online petition objecting to the tone of CEO Ginni Rometty’s letter to US president Donald Trump, and calling on her affirm what they call the company’s progressive values. […] Other employee petitions call for Oracle to oppose US president Donald Trump’s second travel ban, and to let men who work at US regional supermarket Publix grow beards. Employee petitions are now so popular there’s a website, coworker.org, devoted to hosting them. In some cases, the campaigns work: Starbuck’s relaxed its rules about visible tattoos and unnatural hair color for baristas after thousands signed petitions asking for a change. Sometimes, they fail disastrously. Interns at one (unnamed) company described in a blog about being fired en masse after signing a petition asking for a more relaxed dress code.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&id=10426365&smallembed=1

Mobile Apps

Only install mobile apps from trusted places, and always double-check the privacy settings to ensure you are not giving away too much information.

Samsung's Calls For Industry To Embrace Its Battery Check Process as a New Standard Have Been Ignored

Months after the Galaxy Note 7 debacle, the topic remains too hot for the rest of the wireless industry to handle. From a report on CNET: With Samsung’s Galaxy S8 to launch next week, a renewed discussion of the Note 7, which had an unhealthy tendency to catch fire and which had to be recalled, is inevitable. Samsung opened that door in January when it embarked on a mea culpa tour. Beyond spelling out the cause of the overheating problem in its popular phone, the company unveiled an eight-point battery check system it said surpassed industry practices, and it invited rivals to follow its model. But two months after the introduction, what’s the industry response? A collective shrug. Interviews with phone makers and carriers found that while all placed a high priority on safety, few would talk specifically about Samsung’s new battery check process or the idea of adopting it for themselves.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&id=10406575&smallembed=1

Don't Lose That Device

Did you know that according to the Verizon DBIR team, you are 16 times more likely to lose a laptop or mobile devices than have it stolen? When you are traveling, always double-check to make sure you have your mobile device with you, such as when you finish going through airport security, leave your taxi or check out of your hotel.

Slashdot Asks: Are Password Rules Bullshit?

Here’s what Jeff Atwood, a founder of Stack Overflow thinks: Password rules are bullshit. They don’t work. They heavily penalize your ideal audience, people that use real random password generators. Hey, guess what, that password randomly didn’t have a number or symbol in it. I just double checked my math textbook, and yep, it’s possible. I’m pretty sure. They frustrate average users, who then become uncooperative and use “creative” workarounds that make their passwords less secure. Are often wrong, in the sense that they are grossly incomplete and/or insane. Seriously, for the love of God, stop with this arbitrary password rule nonsense already. If you won’t take my word for it, read this 2016 NIST password rules recommendation. It’s right there, “no composition rules”. However, I do see one error, it should have said “no bullshit composition rules”. What do you think?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&id=10348783&smallembed=1

Securely Disposing Mobile Devices

Do you plan on giving away or selling one of your older mobile devices? Make sure you wipe or reset your device before disposing of it. If you don’t, the next person who owns it will have access to all of your accounts and personal information.

Cloud Security

One of the most effective steps you can take to protect your cloud account is to make sure you are using two-step verification. In addition, always be sure you know exactly whom you are sharing files with. It is very easy to accidently share your files with the entire Internet when you think you are only sharing them with specific individuals.

Back up Your Files

Eventually, we all have an accident or get hacked. And when we do, backups are often the only way to recover. Backups are cheap and easy; make sure you are backing up all of your personal information (such as family photos) on a regular basis.