Open Ports Create Backdoors In Millions of Smartphones

An anonymous reader writes: “Mobile applications that open ports on Android smartphones are opening those devices to remote hacking, claims a team of researchers from the University of Michigan,” reports Bleeping Computer. Researchers say they’ve identified 410 popular mobile apps that open ports on people’s smartphones. They claim that an attacker could connect to these ports, which in turn grant access to various phone features, such as photos, contacts, the camera, and more. This access could be leveraged to steal photos, contacts, or execute commands on the target’s phone. Researchers recorded various demos to prove their attacks. Of these 410 apps, there were many that had between 10 and 50 million downloads on the official Google Play Store and even an app that came pre-installed on an OEMs smartphones. “Research on the mobile open port problem started after researchers read a Trend Micro report from 2015 about a vulnerability in the Baidu SDK, which opened a port on user devices, providing an attacker with a way to access the phone of a user who installed an app that used the Baidu SDK,” reports Bleeping Computer. “That particular vulnerability affected over 100 million smartphones, but Baidu moved quickly to release an update. The paper detailing the team’s work is entitled Open Doors for Bob and Mallory: Open Port Usage in Android Apps and Security Implications, and was presented Wednesday, April 26, at the 2nd IEEE European Symposium on Security and Privacy that took place this week in Paris, France.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&id=10549715&smallembed=1

MIT Creates 3D-Printing Robot That Can Construct a Home Off-Grid In 14 Hours

Kristine Lofgren writes: Home building hasn’t changed much over the years, but leave it to MIT to take things to the next level. A new technology built at MIT can construct a simple dome structure in 14 hours and it’s powered by solar panels, so you can take it to remote areas. MIT’s 3D-printing robot can construct the entire basic structure of a building and can be customized to fit the local terrain in ways that traditional methods can’t do. It even has a built-in scoop so it can prepare the building site and gather its own construction materials. You can watch a video of the 3D-printing robot in action here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

https://slashdot.org/slashdot-it.pl?op=discuss&id=10549453&smallembed=1

Threatpost News Wrap, April 28, 2017

Mike Mimoso and Chris Brook recap this year’s SOURCE Boston Conference and discuss the week in news, including the long term implications of the NSA’s DoublePulsar exploit, and the HipChat breach.